Trajan
Trajan

The original template for this one-weight, all-caps font was the inscription on Trajan’s Column, carved in AD 113 to celebrate the emperor Trajan’s victory in the Dacian Wars. College student Jason Smith copied the stone lettering from the cast on display in London’s Victoria & Albert Museum.

In Roman times, the signmaker would paint letters onto stone with a wide brush for the stone mason to chisel out later. The signwriter would end each stroke with a flick of his brush, which the mason would also carve into the stone.

Ecce (as they would have said in Rome): the serif was born.

Trajan
Hand-crafted
Hand-crafted

“I first drew this typeface when I was 17,” says Jason. “I drew it with a very sharp 9H pencil on polydraw film.

“Then, using a Rotring pen, I inked the letters in and scraped back the serifs so they were perfectly sharp. These letters were then reduced on a PMT camera. I’d designed my first typeface, although it wasn’t digitised till much later.”

Jason Smith
Hand-crafted
Digitised
Digitised

Years after Jason had drawn the original typeface, its transfer into digital form made further refinements necessary. The serifs and weights needed thickening slightly, creating a crisp, new version whose delicate elegance is best appreciated in larger sizes.

A classically-inspired font, timeless and perfectly-proportioned, to reflect the refinement of premium brands.

Digitised
Uppercase
Punctuation & Marks