Font index

FS Millbank

is the significant type
Light
Light
Light Italic
Light Italic
Regular
Regular
Italic
Italic
Bold
Bold
Bold Italic
Bold Italic
Heavy
Heavy
Heavy Italic
Heavy Italic
Negative Light
Negative Light
Negative Light Italic
Negative Light Italic
Negative Regular
Negative Regular
Negative Italic
Negative Italic
Negative Bold
Negative Bold
Negative Bold Italic
Negative Bold Italic
Negative Heavy
Negative Heavy
Negative Heavy Italic
Negative Heavy Italic
Icons
Icons
A sign of something better
A sign of something better

When designer Stuart de Rozario surveyed the fonts used in signage on London’s public transport systems, he reached a dead end. They seemed staid, sterile, lacking in personality, and ill-suited to use by modern brands.

He was pointed in another direction entirely. ‘The driving force behind my thoughts was to design something more current and fresh without compromising legibility and clarity. A font with both personality and function, that’s versatile and large and small sizes, and effortless to read, but which also says something new.’

Stuart de Rozario
A sign of something better
Speed reading
Speed reading

Late for a meeting and can’t find your way? Trying to catch a flight? Lost in a hospital? Reading signs is a different business to reading a book or a newspaper. Text on signs needs to be deciphered quickly and effortlessly. So the legibility criteria for signage letterforms are different to those for normal reading, too.

Throughout FS Millbank’s uppercase and lowercase alphabets, characters have been given features for extra definition, including: wide ink traps on the A, K, M, V, W, X and Y; a serifed i, accentuated spurs on the a, d, l u; and different x-height shapes on the b, g, p and q.

Distinctive forms and generous, open internal shapes all help the quick reading of sign text, and wide, open terminals and counters allow similar letter shapes to be distinguished easily when viewed at different angles. Running down a corridor, maybe...

Speed reading
Positive/negative
Positive/negative

Standard type tends to glow on the kind of dark backgrounds often used for signage, and look heavier than its true weight. To correct the imbalance caused by this optical trick, special weights of the typeface have to be drawn for these ‘negative’, light-on-dark applications.

These are lighter than their comparable positive weights to overcome the ‘glow’ effect. After extensive tests of the negative weights, at all sizes, we achieved the right optical balance. Glowing, glowing, gone.

Positive/negative
Icons
Icons

This wouldn’t be a signage typeface without its own set of icons, or symbols, to help people find what they’re looking for. So, to sit alongside the positive and negative fonts, we’ve created a comprehensive set of 172 icons, covering a wide range of applications from transport and user interface to information and directional. Designed within the typeface capital height, they sit on the baseline and are spaced centrally.

Icons
Lowercase
Uppercase
Figures & Currency (Tabular Lining)
Figures & Currency (Proportional Lining)
Figures & Currency (Tabular Oldstyle)
Figures & Currency (Proportional Oldstyle)
Mathematical Forms
Superiors & Fractions
Punctuation & Marks
Ligatures
Discretionary Ligatures
Accents
Icons